Wouldn’t you like to have some way of knowing that what you are viewing in the market could reasonably be defined as a fakeout. That is to say, a breakout that never truly takes hold. This is exactly the kind of thing that many traders wish they had some kind of indicator for. Their belief is that, if they could just figure out when the market was truly breaking out and when it was just producing false signals that didn’t truly add up to a breakout, then they could determine for themselves which way things were likely to go.

It is not uncommon to see resistance and support levels broken and believe that a breakout is on the way only for the market to react in the complete opposite direction. When this occurs, it can take a lot of the profits that a trader might have otherwise have made down with it.

How to Detect Fakeouts

How to Detect Fakeouts

Support and Resistance Levels Can Be Deceptive for Detecting Breakouts

Support and resistance levels are always extremely tricky to figure out. As much as we might want to be able to determine where these levels are likely to be, the reality for most of us is that predicting where price may find support or resistance is never easy. Essentially, support and resistance levels

Support Levels

These are levels where a currency pair is believed to have enough buying support to keep it held steady at a certain price. It may be a buying opportunity when price hits up against these levels — and even sometimes if they are broken slightly.

Resistance Levels

There are also price levels that are difficult to be broken through. These are known as resistance levels, and they work in the opposite way. They are a price at which the trader believes it is unlikely that they will see continued buying. They may be the right place to put in a sell order, or at least to halt your buying. Like strong support, strong resistance levels often maintain their level, even if slightly broken.